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City of Eagle Pass approves resolution supporting protection against construction of barrier on border due to environmental concerns

As U.S. President Donald Trump continues his persistent efforts to build a Border Wall along the U.S. / Mexico Border. These efforts play out while communities in Texas are seeking to protect their residents from any harm that such barrier would create for their lands and families.

In Maverick County where flooding has devastated numerous areas and where flooding is the norm in Spring, the Eagle Pass City Council has recently acted to attempt to protect the area from any large scale flooding issues that the possible building of such wall would create for the community.

The Eagle Pass City Council approved a resolution in support of Texas House Bill 990, submitted by State Representative Roland Gutierrez relating to a study by the Texas Water Development Board and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regarding the effects of the construction of a border wall on storm drainage and other environmental matters in this state including in Maverick County.

House Bill 990 is seeking to assure that if and when the federal government attempts to take any land in the region they do not change the topography or cause any flooding impacts.

Currently, there are at least 15 condemnation lawsuits by the Federal government in the border valley seeking to seize property from landowners for the possible construction of a border barrier. Locally, there has not been any such actions by the government up to now, however in the future could occur through eminent domain seizures at any moment.

It’s expected that numerous land-owners would possibly challenge any eminent domain efforts by the government in court.

House Bill 990 is a long way from seeing the light of day and could move forward to the legislature if it makes it out of committee. But would face a great barrier under the Federal Government’s leverage of eminent domain laws.

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